.: aircraft

CONTENTS

Flying Site Rules
    - Whissendine
    - Melton Airfield
    - Burrough Hill

Hints & Tips
    - Model Cleaning
     - Fitting Engine Mounts

Featured Models
- Gee Bee
- ME109E
- Ultimate Biplane
Gloster Javelin
FW190-A3
- AutoGyro
- FR3
Flying Site Rules

Whissendine

 
1. PARKING - Please leave space in front of the gate for unloading and turning. Park your vehicle on the gate side  only with all wheels on the grass.
No Parking is permitted on the other side
which then allows for large tractors to pass.

2. Entry - Entry to the field is by a hand gate with a combination padlock.
The last person leaving the field must ensure the gate is locked.
Always keep the gate shut to prevent any of the farmer's animals from escaping.

3. Your Membership Car(Key Fob) is your authority to fly at this site. 
Hook it against your chosen vacant frequency number on the peg board.

    4. All pilots must adhere to the designated flying zones as shown on the site plan.
        Always fly in front of you at all times.
        Do not fly beyond the pylons to your left or over the road to your right

    5. NO FLYING WHATSOEVER IN THE RED NO FLY ZONE.

    6. When Flying ALL pilots must stand in the pilot's box on the flight line.

    7. Only four power flyers to be in the air at one time.

    8. Start your engines in the pits area with your propeller facing outwards towards the field.

    9. Where possible always carry your aircraft to and from the mown take off and landing area along the
mown pathway.

    10. Failsafe - All power models (when fitted with a receiver with a failsafe function) must be set to a     minimum of throttle to idle on the loss of the radio link, regardless of the model's weight. Models over 7kg   must have a working and set failsafe.

    11. Read, Learn and Follow the safety rules and the BMFA Codes of Practice for Model Flying.

    12. No Mobile Phones to be used in the pits area.

13. Please take all litter home.

14. All engines must be adequately and sensibly silenced.

15. Members are not allowed to fly alone unless they have passed their BMFA "A" test.

16. A First Aid Box is located inside the mower shed.

Melton Airfield Flying Site Rules

1. Access to the airfield is off the B6047 via a double gate. The last person leaving the airfield must ensure the gate is secured. Do not reverse out on the main road when leaving.

2. Park your vehicle on the left side only of the access lane in a herringbone stack. Please ensure the wheels of your vehicle remain on the concrete surface and noton the grass verge and definitely not on the farmer's crops. No vehicles are allowed on the runway.  

3. Your Membership Card  is your authority to fly at this site. Hook it against your chosen vacant frequency number on the peg board,

4. All pilots must adhere to the designated flying zones as shown on the site layout. Always fly in front of you at all times.

5. NO FLYING WHATSOEVER IN THE RED NO FLY ZONE. (See Map Below)

6. When Flying ALL pilots must stand in the pilot's box on the flight line.

7. Only four power flyers to be in the air at one time.

8. Start your engines in the pits area with your propeller facing outwards.

9. Where possible always carry your aircraft to and from the landing area.

10. Failsafe - All power models (when fitted with a receiver with a failsafe function) must be set to a     minimum of throttle to idle on the loss of the radio link, regardless of the model's weight. Models over 7kg   must have a working and set failsafe.

11. Read, Learn and Follow the safety rules and the BMFA Codes of Practice for Model Flying.

12. No Mobile Phones to be used in the pits area.

13. Please take all litter home.

14. All engines must be adequately and sensibly silenced.

15. Members are not allowed to fly alone unless they have passed their BMFA "A" test.

16. Permitted Model Flying Times:
For Electric Power and Gliders
9am - 10pm (or dusk) whichever is the sooner in any one day Monday to Sunday.

For Models powered by IC
12 noon - 8pm (or dusk) whichever is the sooner in any one day Monday to Saturday and
10am - 4pm on Sundays or Bank Holidays. 

Model Glider Flying  Rules (Burrough Hill)

1.      Bona fide paid up members of the Club must produce a valid membership card when requested to do so by the Ranger or other duly authorised officers of the Leicestershire County Council.

2.      All members using the car park at Burrough Hill shall pay the current parking charge and display a valid car park ticket.

3.      No gliders are to be allowed to land on adjoining land not leased to the County Council

4.      Under no circumstances is any interference whatsoever to be caused to members of the general public visiting Burrough Hill or to licensees of or tenants of the County Council.

5.      Club members are at all times to comply with any reasonable request made by the County Councils Ranger regarding the flying of gliders.

6.      Club members agree to comply with the byelaws of Burrough Hill Country Park.

7.      Club members must show consideration and respect to other users of the flying site at all times.

8.      Club members must fly safely and within the safety standards as required by the B.M.F.A.

Hints & Tips

Model Cleaning - submitted by David Peet
       
Looking for something to help clean the oily residue from your model? Then try this- "fresh and green" KITCHEN AND HOB DEGREASER. I bought mine from ASDA but I guess most supermarkets will stock it. I use it after every flight and find it very effective on Solarfilm covered models. It even works on older models with dried on and dirty oily residues. It's in a spray bottle so it's easy to use and carry. For those of you who are environmentally concious  it's made from plant extracts and so is safe for the environment.

Fitting Engine Mounts - submitted by Trevor Main

    This tip is particularly useful if you are replacing an engine mount on an existing model and the fixing holes on the replacement mount do not line up with the original fixing holes on the model's plywood engine firewall. The technique also applies to any model where you are unable to reach the firewall from within the fuselage in order to place nuts on to the engine mount fixing bolts.

    What you need:

  • Blind nuts (the type with barbs which "dig in" to the ply firewall), thread size to suit your engine mount fixing bolts.
  • A length of threaded rod (the same thread size as the blind nuts) and long enough to reach through the engine bulkhead into the fuselage to a point where you can now reach the rod with your fingers.
  • A drill bit with a diameter to enable drilling of clearance holes for the threaded stub of the captive nuts.
    Procedure:
  1. Mark the position of the engine mount fixing holes on the bulkhead (F1) and the drill these using the drill specified above.
  2. Now push the threaded rod through one of the holes just drilled so you can now reach the end of it from within the fuselage.
  3. Attach a blind nut to the rod and pull the rod back through the firewall so that the barbs on the nut dig into the ply. (It may help to fit a washer and plain nut to the other end of the rod and screw these against the bulkhead thereby pulling the blind nut barbs into the ply).
  4. Unscrew the threaded rod leaving the blind nut now fixed in position.
  5. Repeat steps 2,3 & 4 for the remaining blind nuts.
  6. Now fit your engine mount to the bulkhead using the engine mount fixing bolts.


Featured Models

GEE BEE Racer - (Mick Butler)



Powered by a Laser 200 V-Twin glow engine  and turning an 18x6 prop at 9600rpm, Mick constructed this 18lb model to fly as a member of TEAM GB. TEAM GB was established to recreate the pylon racing era of the 1940s. 


ME109E - (Trevor Main)








Many MDMC members will be aware of Trevor Main's ME109E project which he started in December 2006. So, after 2 years what progress has been made?   The accompanying photographs show airframe construction to be almost complete and build quality to an exceptionally high standard. As is customary with Trevor's projects, keeping model weight to a minimum is a high priority. His construction techniques enable him to achieve this without any sacrifice to strength or scale detail.

The model is being built from a Brian Taylor plan which Trevor has had scaled-up from its original 68" wingspan to 97", giving a true 1/4 scale model. Trevor has also calculated that when complete it just fits inside his car!


Estimated finished weight is 25lbs and powered by a MOKI 210 turning a 20x10 prop, performance is expected to be true to scale.

To ensure a scale finish Trevor has had to overcome several technical problems. Wheels, tyres, canopy and spinner were commercially unavailable to acceptable scale and weight criteria, so all of these have been designed  by Trevor for construction from conventional materials.  Also, to achieve a completely enclosed  engine installation, yet still retain easy access to the engine bay, a manifold and silencer system had to be "scratch" built. 
Wheel details.
The tyres are 6-3/8" diameter x 1.5" wide shaped from foam blanks by Alan Odom.
The two piece hubs were turned from plywood also by Alan Odom.

Manifold and Silencer details.
Manifold flange is mild steel with the rigid and flexible pipe work being stainless steel and all silver soldered. The silencer is 1/16" thick alum. and has one internal baffle all tig welded by Simon Askew.

The cockpit interior is very impressive with all instruments and controls custom built based on photographs of the original full size aircraft.

Trevor anticipates having airframe construction complete before this summer, leaving next winter to finish covering and painting. So, Spring 2010 should see the first test flight, and knowing Trevor as we do, no doubt it will be faultless.

No pressure then Trevor!

May 2010 - Update

Over the winter steady progress has been made mainly in adding detail to the basic airfrme and completing installation of servo and undercarriage "plumbing". The engine bay has been painted and fuel proofed. Preparation for airframe painting has now been started with the application of sanding sealer and some paint primer
The photos below give you some indication of the level of detail and the scale of this project. It is worth remembering that this model is completely scratch built.






First Test Flight

31st August 2011 - the day finally dawned and it couldn't be put off any longer, Trevor had to give this model its first test flight. I say day, in actual fact it was a rather grey and gloomy evening but the conditions were calm. Ideal for the test flight but not for the photos.

As we all expected Trevor's consumate modelling skills had resulted in a model which just had to fly. Following the usually preliminaries Trevor taxyed out on to the runway at Barkston Heath. With little hesitation the model was lined up for take off and the throttle opened.
After approximately 10m the tail came up, acceleration continued on the main wheels and then away it climbed.  As Trev himself would say..... Bootiful!

A couple of circuits and it was time to test the retracts. One leg came up ok but the port leg seemed a little reluctant. However with the U/C finally tucked away some high speed passes were executed.

Now for the landing. Undercart down and half flaps selected the downwind leg was without incident. Turning finals and on a curved approach all looked well, albeit a tad fast.  An early flare sorted the speed out and the model touched down with just a single bounce. A little correction for the slight crosswind prevented  any runway rash to the port wing but Trev's ME109 had done it!

Trevor's verdict after 4 years of construction - it flies! Well done Herman! What an understatement.






      


                                       




                  

                                                                     





With everything appearing satisfactory after the first flight the ME109 was refuelled in readiness for a second test. The usually reliable MOKI 210 was a little reluctant to start but once running the taxy and take off were normal. A couple of rolls and a loop were executed all without drama. Time to think about the landing when......the engine cut! The downwind leg was immediately shortened in readiness for a "deadstick". Flaps and undercarriage down Trevor executed a perfect touch down...Phew!

However on inspection the Moki engine had obviously been stressed as turning the prop over resulted a graunching sound. For some reason the engine had leaned out considerably during the fight - but why?

Post Mortem
Subsequent investigation has revealed there was a problem with the fuel. So once repairs are carried out to the engine and the retracts overhauled we can expect Trevor to be demonstrating his ME109 to club members at our flying site.

Ultimate Biplane - (Mark Taylor)


Mark's near half scale biplane has been finished in a very striking colour scheme which Mark designed himself. The photo below does not to justice to the superb finish and the model really needs to be viewed "close up" to appreciate the excellent workmanship.

All control arms, servo arms, fuel and smoke fillers (fuel dots) have been custom made as you can see from the photographs.

Mark has also designed and manufactured the on board smoke system which delivers a really dense smoke trail to compliment the amazing aerobatic manouvers that Mark can demonstrate. If you want to view a video clip of this "monster" being put through it's paces by Mark, click in the box below the photographs.

For the technically minded here is the full specification of this model:

% TOC Ultimate 10-300 Designed by Mike McConville
Powered by DA-150cc and turning a 32 x 10 carbon prop
MT-Smoke-System - my own design
Wing Span: 98.5 in ( 2502mm )
Overall Length: 110 in ( 2974mm )
Wing Area: 3310 sq in
Flying Weight: 19.6kg
Balsa-and-ply construction
Carbon fibere landing gear
Covered in white profilm on top and blue profilm on the bottom
Colour s is all gem stone vinyl graphics made by myself 

RADIO

PowerBox 40/24 Professional powered by 2x 4600 NiMH sub C batteries
Futaba R-5014 DPS 2048 PCM 14ch 35MHz Receiver
Hi-Tec 5955TG 32kg pull servos all around
Seiko PS-050 servo on the rudder powered by it's own 8.4v sub C battery giving 85kg pull !!

ENGINE

DA-150cc Engine
JMB 70mm Canisters, the bulkhead had to be modified to fit the Canisters with air tubes made and fitted inside the fuselage to help cool the Canister.







GLOSTER JAVELIN - (Trevor Main)

Trevor has just started construction of  his latest project - a Gloster Javelin. As a boy this aircraft was one of his favourite
RAF fighters and he has long had an ambition to build an R/C model. With the increasing developments in electric power as a propulsion system Trevor sees the Javelin as an ideal model for an EDF project. Trevor will initially uses props on twin electric motors to prove the model flies before converting to EDF.

Although construction has only just begun Trevor has already invested many hours in scaling up plans for the model and designing
the propulsion system.

The photos below show the fuselage construction and EDF installation details. Trevor says the project is progressing well with sheeting of the fuselage almost complete. As you can see the retractable nose leg is already installed.
The next stage is construction of the "T" Tail , Fin and Rudder. Once this is done Trevor will start building the delta wing.
Update - September 2013
Construction is now complete and radio components, retracts and engine(s) have been "test installed" prior to painting. As can be seen from the photo below the model has had its basic colour applied and the next stage will be to add the camoflage sceme and RAF roundels. Trevor expects to have the completed model on display at our model show with test flying to commence shortly afterwards.

Update - September 23rd 2013 (Maiden Flight)

As can be seen from the photos below, Trevor has stuck to his original design brief to test the model's flight characteristics using electric prop driven power. Some up elevator trim was required to maintain level flight at half power. This  indicated that the intended change to twin EDF units should provide more than ample power.
At one point in the flight one of the electric retracts failed to function, but re-cycling the retract switch on the TX  eventually resulted in "three greens" for the landing. A couple of hops on the landing indicated that more elevator travel will be required for the next flight as well as investigation into the intermittent operation of the landing gear.







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FOCKE WULF 190-A3 (Mick Butler)

Mick has for some time now wanted to acquire a MOKI 250 5 cylinder radial engine. If you've ever heard one (possibly at The Nats or an LMA show) you'll know what an amazing sound they reproduce. In 2012 Mick purchased a half built Sukhoi aerobatic large scale model which included a MOKI 250. Although Mick intends to finish the Sukhoi, this only a "means to an end" as this will become the flying test bed for the MOKI.

Mick's scale model interests are in WWI and WWII aircraft so a search was on to find a more "interesting"  aircraft which would be suited to the large Moki radial. Hence the FW190 project was born.


The F.W. 190 is a fully moulded airframe supplied by Airworld Modelbau , a German manufacturer . Wingspan is 9 foot and finished weight around 40 to 50 pounds.
It will be powered by the MOKI 250 c.c. 5 cylender radial engine delivering 14 h.p. through a 32 inch
dia. prop. Yes that's correct a 32" prop!
As you will appreciate the model is correspondingly large and the photos below will give you some idea of the scale. For such a large model the Large Model Association require inspections to be carried out at various stages of construction to ensure compliance with CAA regulations. Test flights have also to be monitored by an independent inspector before a certifcate for flying at public displays can be awarded.

As you will also see fom the photos the attention to detail in the mouldings is first class with all panel and rivets clearly reproduced to scale. Control surfaces on the full size aircraft were fabric covered and this is faithfuly reproduced in the model.

Mick is currently researching approriate colour schemes for FW190's and hopes to have the model flying and fully certificated by summer 2013.



AUTOGYRO - Ray Pinchin

I have been fascinated by autogyros for some time, ever since I saw “Little Nelly” in a James Bond film, and have now decided to try to design one loosely based on this and the Benson type of design.

Attached are a couple of photos of my own design autogyro I call the “GYRONAUT”. It is currently still in the development stage. It is fitted with a pre-rotator motor and a one way clutch bearing to spin the blades up to speed. I am developing some electronics to allow a very soft start and then cut out when the main motor is powered so the both cannot be on at the same time. LEDs will indicate when the rotor is up to speed.

The blades are still to be constructed and a number of items are still to be test fitted to get the correct C of G. All servos are metal geared; Tower Pro MG 946R 12Kg for the rotor head, and Corona DS-339MG for the rudder.

Main motor is rated at about 800 watt on a 4S LiPo with a 13x8 prop.



FR3 - (Arthur Askew)

The FR3 is a vintage model dating back to 1953 . It was originally built by Fred Rising, who you can see in the photos below,
and subsequently bequeathed to club member Arthur Askew.
The model has a wingspan of 8'6" - in those days models had to have large wingspans in order to lift the assocoiated heavy engines and radio gear. It was powered by a McCoy 49 petrol engine and fitted with a 6ch Reed radio control system.
Much of the radio gear and particularly the servos, were designed by Fred. The servos had a ingenious self centering mechanism which enabled control surfaces to return to a neutral position afte having been "pulsed" to the left/right (or up/down) position by the reeds. The servos also had a slipping clutch arrangement to prevent stalling the servo motor when applying excessive trim.
Fred entered the FR3 into a Concors D'Elegance competition in Belgium but unfortunately we don't know if he was successful.
It was generally flown from a flying site at North Luffenham where Fred's Canadian Air Force colleague (on the left in the photo below) was stationed.
As you can see Arthur has restored Fred's model to flying condition albeit with a modern 3ch radio. It has been recovered in tissue and Dope (as per the original) but given a new paint scheme. Credit goes to Simon Askew for undertaking the re-covering and painting. The cowl has been fashioned from aluminium and the 14x7 prop handmade. The wheels are not the original but as per the original design have been made from rubber toys.
The model weighs 8.5 lbs and has a wing area of 11 sq ft.
Arthur commented that the FR3 "flies extremly well after some adjustments to the C of G".


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